WATCH: “The Nature of Power.”

Video Credit: Wizard of Cause on YouTube.

Power is an essential element of human sociology.  Many of us take it for granted, ignoring the implications of handling power and the consequences of acts of power, which may explain the extravagance we take with power.  Perhaps we need to alter the way we think about power and makes changes to how our social organizations handle power.  What if we thought of power not as a position toward which to aspire to but as a “force of nature” to be directed in a particular way; an act of god which we use with humility and due diligence.

Americans live under multiple governments.

By Dylan R.N. Crabb

 

It seems like most of the corporate media’s focus is on the dealings of the national government, the federal government.  CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC provide 24-hour coverage on what is happening with various national politicians.  It is too be expected since those organizations brand themselves as national news outlets but what about the states in which they are based?  The state governments that those organizations operate under have more of an effect on them than the national government.

A key component of a democratic-republic is its federalist structure (a separation of powers).  The Supremacy Clause of the United States Constitution give the national government ultimate authority in conflicting areas of interest between the national government and the state governments, but the state governments have their own authority within their own respective territories; the states can stand up to the national government in particular instances. Scholars of constitutionalism refer to American states as “laboratories of democracy” because elected officials in each state (and, by extension, their respective municipalities) can tailor their government to their particular populations.

I have yet to see a news program that focuses on the legislative processes of all the governments under which Americans live.